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Governor Mary Fallin

Mary Fallin was elected Oklahoma’s governor on November 2, 2010. During her campaign, Fallin focused on growing the economy, creating jobs, reducing government spending and standing up to the job-killing economic policies coming
from Washington, D.C. Voters swept her into office in an historic election where she became the first woman to be elected governor in Oklahoma.

In 1990, Fallin was elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives where she began a long career of public service focusing on conservative, commonsense solutions to the challenges families and businesses face. As a state legislator, Fallin worked in the Republican minority to forge relationships across the aisle and find common ground with the Democratic majority. She crafted the state’s first “stalker law,” which made it a misdemeanor on the first offense to follow or threaten a person maliciously and a felony on the second.

Fallin also worked in the Oklahoma House to pass a small-business insurance reform act, helping employers acquire and keep affordable health insurance for their employees. She worked to implement smart, affordable, free-market reforms to lower health care costs, while leading the charge against a federal takeover of our health care system in the 1990s. For her leadership and work in the area of health care as a state representative, Fallin was honored as a “Legislator of the Year” by the American Legislative Exchange Council.

Fallin was elected the state’s first woman and first Republican lieutenant governor in 1994 – a position she would hold for 12 years – she focused on issues affecting job creation and economic growth. Fallin served on 10 boards or commissions involving business and quality-of-life issues, including the State Board of Equalization, the Tourism and Recreation Commission and the Oklahoma Land Commission.

Fallin took on the issue of the rising costs of legal fees and workers’ compensation that stifle job growth. In January 1997, the Fallin Commission on Workers’ Compensation released a 57-page, comprehensive reform bill that would lower costs and create a workers’ comp system that was fair to both businesses and workers.

Fallin also used her position as president of the Oklahoma State Senate to force a dramatic showdown on “Right to Work,” which ended the practice of compelling workers to join and pay dues to a union. In 2001, Oklahoma became the first state in the country to pass such a law in more than 25 years. The law is credited for helping to make the state friendlier to job growth and business development.

Fallin was elected to the U.S. Congress in 2006. In Congress, Fallin served on the committees for small business, transportation and infrastructure, natural resources and armed services. Fallin coauthored numerous pieces of legislation that would lower taxes, reduce regulation on businesses and individuals, fight federal overreach,
increase American energy production, create jobs and protect constitutional liberties.

For her service, Fallin was recognized by numerous groups for her defense of free enterprise and family values including. Fallin is a native of Tecumseh and is a member of Crossings Church in Oklahoma City. She and her husband Wade, an Oklahoma City attorney, have six children between them.


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